Ask the ICE Queen Tuesday

 
Hi ICE Queen,
I have recently seen a few paper crafters using ice resin with their stamp pad reinkers as a colorant.  Is this a good type of product to use as a colorant?
Hello,
Sure. You can definitely use the reinkers to color ICE Resin. Also acrylic paints and mica powders. We like to suggest a tiny drop of oil paint, but that’s just our artistic preference. Thanks for writing!
 

The ICE Queen

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Flickr Friday

flickr friday

Today’s Flickr Friday is an amazing cast and altered ICE Resin piece from Harry W. Wood of Harry’s Handmade Jewelry Ideas. Take a look at this incredible little owl and then head over to the blog to see a full tutorial with step-out-photos of how its made. You are NOT going to want to miss this. You many have to scroll down to the May 18th date of the tutorial to read it.

Copyright All Rights Reserved Harry W. Wood

Creative Team Wednesday Hiatus

Creative Team Wednesday

The ICE Queen is taking a little hiatus from blogging Creative Team Wednesdays. After being at the CREATE Cloth, Paper, Scissors Art Retreat and getting ready for the upcoming Bead and Button Show, she is in need of a blogging break to focus on some behind-the-scenes goodness that will be unveiled at our booth in Milwaukee. Please check back again soon (we’ll be sure to announce a new CTW blog post on our Facebook and Twitter pages) to see what new things the ladies of the Creative Team have worked up for your viewing pleasure.

Thanks and have a truly Artful day!

 

Ask the ICE Queen Tuesday

Ask the Ice Queen Tuesday
 
Hi ICE Queen,
 
I have an etsy shop, and I make resin pendants to order.  My question  is this:  After I pour the resin, when is it safe to mail them?  The harden time is 6 hours, but 3 days to fully cure.  I’m currently using a UV resin so that I can ship them out quickly, but I’m not totally thrilled with the product I’m using.  I’ve used ICE resin in the past and loved it, and the new 1-oz syringe is perfect for small batches.  However, I don’t think I can wait three days to mail them out.  Any suggestions?
Hello,
 
The way epoxy resins work is that they dry and cure from the inside to the outside. They dry fairly quickly, 6 to 12 hours and the dry time can be sped up by putting your freshly poured bezels under a warm task lamp to allow the heat to quicken the reaction between the part A resin and part B hardener. The resin does take 3 full days to cure, but that just means to not put them in a tighly sealed plastic container. You can send your pendants in the mail as soon as the resin is fully dry to the touch. I would just suggest wrapping them in a piece of muslim or putting them into a small cloth bag or bit of felt first and then packing them in bubble wrap to mail out. I have never had a problem mailing my resin pieces before the cure time, but we do warn customers that because ICE Resin air dries that the lack of exposure to oxygen could turn the resin cloudy if its sealed too tightly before the 3 day cure time. This issue is not just related to ICE Resin, but to all epoxy resins due to chemisty.
 
What makes ICE Resin the clearest product on the market is that its jeweler’s grade, meaning we start the formula with the highest grade of resin available. Because ICE has other components that make it self doming, self leveling and self healing is what allows artists to achieve professional looking results.
 
The ICE Queen

Inspiration Monday

Inspiration Monday

Hello everyone- karen here & it’s inspiration Monday! each week I will be sharing with you bits of inspiration I have bookmarked from around the web. I hope that some of these goodies will inspire you

AJ Fosik

beetles weevils and flies no.10

golly bard

amy blackwell

miyawichawa

good mood factory

image

inspired by the season

 

that’s my inspiration collection for this week! see you next monday ♥

*karen

you can come visit me over here.

 

Ask the ICE Queen Tuesday

Ask the Ice Queen Tuesday

Dear ICE QUEEN,

I am using Swarovski crystals to glue on a GMC emblem and I am was wondering if the ICE Resin can be used to coat the crystals for a smooth finish without losing their color. I am trying to use it as say a  polyurethane type coating.

Dear creative one,

Absolutely you can use ICE Resin as a sealer coat over Swarovski crystals. Because ICE Resin is so crystal clear, you can still see the shine and sparkle of the crystals through it. When using it as a sealer coat, be sure to mix up a small batch of resin and hardener (1/2 ounce) and then use a disposable plastic paintbrush to “paint” on a sealer coat (as you would with polyutherane or varnish). Because ICE Resin is self leveling, you will not see the brush
strokes as it dries.
Have a creative day!
The ICE Queen

Inspiration Monday

Inspiration Monday

Hello everyone- karen here & it’s inspiration Monday! each week I will be sharing with you bits of inspiration I have bookmarked from around the web. I hope that some of these goodies will inspire you

I’ve been a fan of Eva’s work for quite some time- I love that all her pieces are hand dyed with natural materials.

check out her blog- she’s dyeing with dandelions! love it :)


this photo by f letter pretty much states how I always feel this time of year when the days are are longer and a bit warmer…

 

Hair Jewelry from the British Museum collection captured by Kotomicreations .

 

i’ve got a serious art crush on the work of evan b harris. check out his website & flickr page here.

 

& this sweet little print of Krishna by Sarah McNeil.

 

Mandolin Girl from the New York Public Library. They have TONS of fabulous photos in their stream.

 

that’s my inspiration collection for this week! see you next monday ♥

*karen

you can come visit me over here.

 

Flickr Friday 2 for 1

flickr friday

Hello all,

Today’s Flickr Friday is from pinsnneedles_2000 (no real name given on her Flickr profile). What we liked about this piece is her lovely wirework and color combination of the pearls and gemstones. They perfectly set off the colorful artwork placed inside the bezels and filled with ICE Resin. The owner of this photostream said in her description this bracelet was a commissioned piece for an artist using vignettes of her work combined with words that have special meaning.

And because it’s Mother’s Day this Sunday, we wanted to give you a special bonus for Flickr Friday, so we also choose to feature the work of Brenda Sue Lansdown of B’Sue Boutiques, a wonderful online jewelry supply store. Take a look at her brass cuff and her detailed ICE Resin-filled bezel. Trust us on this one, folks, adding this many elements and getting them to layer so beautifully takes some not only skill and talent, but a good amount of time put into working with ICE Resin and knowing how to take advantage of all its artistic goodness. Brenda Sue has what it takes!

B'Sue Boutiques

Here’s wishing all you amazing creative women out there in the world a Happy Mother’s Day!

CTW – Jen Cushman

Creative Team Wednesday

Kristen, Barbe, Jane, Deryn and Kecia — all members of our Creative Team – do a lot of inspirational work! using ICE Resin and Susan’s handmade bezels that we then have cast for our customer’s creative use. Each week, we’ll feature designs from our Creative Team. Sometimes, we might even slip in some images from Susan Lenart Kazmer or Jen Cushman’s work using ICE Resin too.

***

A lot of of customers have been writing the ICE Queen lately with questions about sealing images. There seems to be some confusion where people think you absolutely must seal images before putting them into a bezel and pouring ICE Resin to create a mixed-media collage look to your jewelry.

The choice of first sealing your images or not is a personal one. It’s also a personal artistic aesthetic. One of the things I find most magical about ICE Resin is how it effects paper. Some papers turn almost completely transparent when the resin wicks into the paper fibers. Others, turn a lovely translucency where parts of the image are still brightly colored with the edges fading out. Some images, particularly photographs can turn slightly grey around their edges if not properly sealed before resin is poured on top of them. When it comes to using photographs, my personal preference is to always seal the images in either packing tape or a medium such as Collage Pauge or white craft glue. 

For today’s Creative Team Wednesday, I wanted to show an image from my book. A collage focal pendant is attached to an etched brass cuff with our micro nuts and screws. When I was creating this bezel, I was going for layered collage look with bits and pieces of torn paper. I chose to seal the background book text with Collage Pauge, to keep it colorfast, as well as the cut out scrap of the sunflower. I left the tiny pieces of torn map paper and vintage sheet music unsealed, because I wanted the resin to seep into these scraps and go translucent.  

I feel I successfully achieved the look I was aiming for: Bright summer sunflower, set against a neautral background and pops of color from the map paper. The airy feeling I wanted comes from the scraps of sheet music floating near the top of the bezel.

The best advice I can give you when you first begin to create with ICE Resin is to purchase some inexpensive bezels and use them for practice. Experiment with sealing images and leaving others unsealed. Make a collage layer, pour some resin and let it dry. Do another collage layer, mix up some new resin and do another pour.

Susan recently gave ICE an acronym for what she believes her product is as an art medium. ICE: Imagine. Create. Explore. Giving yourself the freedom to do these things will most certainly take your work to new horizons.

Here’s wishing you an Artful day! — Jen

Ask the ICE Queen

 

Ask the Ice Queen Tuesday

Dear ICE Queen,
  
I have a few silver bezel charms I have filled with ICE Resin that, upon hardening, have various flaws in them. Is there any product or instructions to remove the resin so I can reuse the charms? Hope that makes sense? Thanks!
 

Hello,

Yes, there is a product to soak pieces in to remove epoxy resin, but it contains hazardous chemical warnings, so please do your research and make an informed decision before using. It’s called Attack, and you can buy it at most jewelry supply stores.

Before you go to that extreme, have you tried to first drill out the imperfections or sand out the flaws? Because ICE Resin is self-healing, you can drill through it or sand it and then mix up a new batch of ICE Resin and re-apply it to your bezels. The new layer of ICE will bind itself to the previous layer and will self-heal the marks you made, drying completely crystal clear.
 
You can also drill out any bubbles that may have dried in the resin using your flex shaft or Dremel tool, mix up a fresh batch of ICE Resin and pour another layer. Be sure to work the fresh resin into the drill holes with the tip of a toothpick to really get the resin down into the holes so it can seal them up and self-heal. If you have already domed your bezels and are worried if you pour a new layer that you will overpour your bezels and cause an overflow, use a plastic disposable paintbrush to “paint” on a new layer of ICE Resin, rather than dripping it on with your craft stick. Still use your toothpick though to work the fresh resin into the drill holes.
 
Thanks for writing. Here’s wishing you a creative day!
 
The ICE Queen
***
The customer replied with another question:
Thank you for your reply. My problem is I tried various recommended methods (glue, spray varinish, etc_) to seal my paper which had lettering printed from the computer and still after gluing and using the ICE Resin had very disappointing results. It resulted in ‘spots’ and were unaccepted looking. For future reference, what is your advice for sealing the printed  paper and also what glue –of the tons available would you now recommend?
 
Hello again,
I use a lot of images printed from my home ink jet computer. The quickest and easiest way I seal my images is with clear packing tape. I put my image on a piece of tape and then make a little art sandwich where I seal the tape’s edges completely. I cut my images slightly small than the bezel, so I can leave a tiny clear tape edge completely around my bezel so no resin seeps into the paper. Sealing images in a chapter in my book, Explore, Create, Resinate; Mixed Media Techniques Using ICE Resin. If you plan to do a lot of work with resin in the future, I do recommend the book. I wrote it as the essential cookbook for using resin and give tons of tips and tricks.
 
If you follow these guidelines, you should not have any issues in the future.
The ICE Queen
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