Contents, a paper, metal and ICE Resin bracelet by Susan Lenart Kazmer

content-bracelet susan lenart kazmer

“Contents” a bracelet by Susan Lenart Kazmer

No. 22, Volume … unknown.

When was the first time you tore pages out of a book to make jewelry?

If you would like to learn more about Susan’s techniques working with resin and metal, her recent book “Resin Alchemy” and DVDs “Forge Wire Cages” and “Explorations in Jewelry Enameling” are available now.

 

 

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Use Iced Enamels Glitz Powder with a stencil to create an art journal

ICE-Resin-mixedmedia-journal-CraftyCutieA while ago I started what I am now calling my motivational art journal. The concept behind it was IF you DO, you will BE. A little acronym I came up with to encourage myself during a very anxious time of life. The letters stand for Intention, Focus, Direction, Organization, Balance, Excellence. Although I am still battling anxiety on a daily basis, I have defined and documented my intention and am moving forward onto trying to FOCUS.

I created this page in my journal after reading a quote by Alexander Graham Bell that said “Concentrate all your thoughts on the task at hand. The sun’s rays do not burn until brought into focus.” It really spoke to my heart as I realized my lack of mental dedication when faced with a task to complete. From now on when I am struggling with completion, I will think of this image and its message. It seems as though in order to truly shine, one must focus all of their attention on intention.

ice resin one focusice resin two focusSupplies:
Iced Enamels™ Medium
Iced Enamels™ Glitz Gold
chipboard
heat tool
sponge
stencil
painting materials
yellow, orange and green paint
sponge
head button
laser printout

ice resin three focusice resin 4 focusInstructions:
1. Cut a piece of a map to fit the chipboard and glue it down.
2. Paint bottom section of chipboard green.
3. Apply a small amount of Iced Enamels™ Medium onto a sponge.
4. Dab a thin layer of Iced Enamels™ Medium over the sunburst stencil.
5. Sprinkle the Gold Glitz Iced Enamels™ over the entire area.
6. Tap off excess powder and fuse Iced Enamels™with a heat gun.
7. Paint the white sun rays yellow, and their edges orange.
8. Print a quote on a laser printer and individually cut out each word.
9. Glue button head down, then all of the words in a radial pattern.
10. Write out your word out over the grassy area and embellish.

ice resin 5 focusWishing you smiles and sunshine,
Tatiana Allen, Crafty Cutie

Catch Susan Lenart Kazmer at Art & Soul Retreats

a rt n soul logoLooking for ICE Resin and bezels and cool Relique Powders to cold enamel jewelry?  You can find them in the vendor hall at Art & Soul, Virginia Beach.

 

Susan’s workshops are all filled at Art & Soul, Virginia Beach, happening later this month, but don’t fret! You can catch up with Susan in the Spring
at Art N Soul, Portland, March 2-8, 2015

 

Victory-Susan-Lenart-Kazmer

P179 – WIRE- Ancient techniques on New Frontiers- Forging + Brazing

P180 – Enamels-Sgraffito + Symbolism- Making your own Mark

P181 – Resin, Relics and Ancient Artifacts

 

 

Grab the stamp of your choice and make a design on metal with Relique Powder

Did you know you can use a stamp on metal with Susan Lenart Kazmer’s cold enameling system?

Tatiana Allen will how you how.

You’ll need a stamp, some Iced Enamels Medium, Chartreuse Relique, a Heart Silhouette, and ICE Resin.

chartreuse-relique-heart-silhouette

Don’t forget that in order to make a permanent cold enameling fusion, you need a layer of ICE Resin on the top of the Relique Powder pattern you have added to the silhouette.

 

 

Use your lariat to lasso a CREATE Dallas class with instructor Jen Cushman

Jen Cushman teaching at CREATE ChicagoWorkshop creation usually starts in the artist’s studio nearly a year before the art event takes place. When students request a class, that process begins even before the current class is over.

Jen Cushman says, “The Links, Clasps, Components, and Chains class came directly out of a CREATE art retreat in 2013. My students in Chicago were casting in ICE Resin and they kept asking me wire-working questions. There simply was not time to teach wire working and resin, so I asked them,  If I taught a class and in it you had a spool of wire and with that spool you learned to create connections would that be fun?” 

A class is born:

JenCushmanJen.LinksClasps.3-LgLINKS, CLASPS, COMPONENTS AND CHAIN (6 HOURS)

Students will leave with a finished necklace and a foundation to make your own components, which will save you money.

One of the most rewarding aspects of making mixed-media jewelry is being able to see the hand of the artist in your work. Learning the skills to make gorgeous necklaces, bracelets, rings, pins and more from spools of humble wire is an art form all unto itself. Fortunately, making components from wire is not only deeply fulfilling, it’s economical on your pocketbook and easier to accomplish than one might think. In this workshop, you will learn how to make bead links, wire links, clasps and components and then how to chain them together to create one seamless and beautiful wearable work of art. The fundamental skills learned in this class will help you build a strong foundation for future work.

Registration for  Dallas CREATE classes happens right HERE.

JenCushmanJen.JournalJewelry.2-LgART JOURNAL JEWELRY (6 HOURS)

Students will leave with three finished pendants that you can make necklaces with plus some beautiful loose collage pages created from your intuitive imagery.

Art Journaling is a way to let your authentic, creative voice sing with paper, pens, paint and various other art supplies. In this brand new workshop, you will be learning to work through the intuitive process of creating colorful, spontaneous expressions of yourself. The second part of the workshop takes the art journaling process one step further with techniques to cut, collage and re-imagine your paper pages into resin jewelry. Basic jewelry skills are helpful, but absolutely not necessary for this class. Learn how to turn your journal art into gorgeous art to wear!

JenCushmanJen.Enameling.3-LgCOLORFUL COLD ENAMELING (3 HOURS)

Students will learn new techniques for adding permanent color to metal along with a handful of completed charms to later incorporate into your mixed-media jewelry, collage or assemblage work.

Cold enameling is a new art process utilizing micas, enameling powders, glitter powders and other interesting surface mediums in conjunction with a glasslike product called ICE Resin. These mediums used in tandem with time honored metalworking techniques add color and texture to metal. Instruction will focus on various techniques of the cold enamel process and hands-on experimentation and play with the products to create gorgeous metal jewelry pendants.

JenCushmanJen.ReadySetNEW.1-LREADY, SET, RESINATE (3 HOURS)

Students will leave with a handful of collaged resin pendants to use a focal pendants for your jewelry or in your collages and assemblages.

Turn your eye for design into fabulous and unique jewelry. During class we will use handcrafted bezels, oodles of images, a jeweler’s-grade resin and the most important tool of all—your imagination—to make a trio of resin pendants. Learn how to properly mix and pour a two-part epoxy resin, add color if you so choose, embed small objects like rhinestones or beads and how to bling it up with glitter and mica. These images are idea samples of what you can create, but you will personalize your pendant to fit your individual art aesthetic, style and favorite color palettes.

JenCushmanJen.LariatNEW.3-LgFOR THE LOVE OF LARIATS (6 HOURS)

Students will leave with a dozen new skills guaranteed to take your jewelry making to the next level.

Who doesn’t love a good lariat? These chic necklaces are easy to wear and fun to make, particularly when you create them using mixed-media techniques of cold enameling, fiber manipulation and wireworking along with traditional metalworking skills. Cold enameling is a new art process that looks like glossy kiln-fired or torch-fired enamels without the use of fire or flame. You will also learn metalworking skills of cutting, annealing, texturizing, and forming sheet metal into interesting shapes that are not only beautiful but structurally integral to the lariat design. This workshop focuses on learning new skills and techniques while still making beautiful jewelry components. If you’re new to jewelry making, don’t be intimidated. Cold enameling is a fun and easy process and Jen Cushman has some premade metal components for those who might not wish to delve into metal cutting and forming.

And just so you don’t have to scroll back up… registration for  Dallas CREATE classes happens right HERE.

Hope to see you there.

Which class will be your favorite?

 

Shaker Box Pendants with ICE Resinated paper by Sandy Martin

You’ll find the instructions for Susan Lenart Kazmer’s Shaker Box Bezel on page 87 of her book, Resin Alchemy.

Sandy Martin, an accomplished artist and member of our ICE Resin Creative Team in 2013, was an ardent student. She made these beautiful shaker box pendants.

It’s about movement ~ dangling beads and ribbons extending from pencil bezels.

Sandy-Martin-shaker-boxes-2-ICE-Resin

What would you place inside a shaker bezel of your own? Confetti from a special party? Sand from that Hawaiian beach? Words?

ICE-Resin-shaker-boxes-1-Sandy-Martin

What kind of necklace would you string each of these lovelies on? Ribbon? Wire? Leather?

 

Button Up, a unisex ICE Resin necklace by Jen Crossley

Whenever I am lucky enough to travel I always make time to stop at flea markets.

I used an old eyelet hook for button shoes and a tag I found in an Ohio flea market.

 

ICE-Resin-Jen-Crossley-Button-Up

The double jump onto the leather cord was called for to balance the weight of the tag and ICE Resin filled bezel. I also filled it with paper torn from a bag and canvas fabric.

Silver and bronze gave the necklace a nice contrast and a masculine feel.

Mr. Siley, I wonder what kind of mail you received so long ago?

Day 2: Quintessentially Christmas Blog Hop with ICE Resin and Indigo Blu

“Helen Louise’s Happy Christmas” a mixed media collage using ICE Resin and Flitter Flakes by Carol La Valley, ICE Resin Content Manager

IndigoBlu-ICEResin-Hop-1

When I began this project I knew I wanted to try painting Flitter on a photograph. Our hop is Christmas-themed, so that helped, but I really did not have in mind anything specific in mind other than altering a photo. Now I understand why occasionally designers groan when asked, “What was your inspiration?” Helen Louise, like most of us, evolved and emerged as the day went on.

art-mechanique-essentialsICE Resin materials:
ICE Resin®
Craft Cup and Stir Stick
1 Sheet from Art Mechanique™ Collage Paper Pack
Art Mechanique™ Paper Sealer

Indigo Blu materials:
Yorkshire Dales Flitter Flake
Flitter Glue
Piece of Flitter Scrubby
Vodka Martini, Goldfinger, and Miss Moneypenny English Cottage Acrylics

IndigoBlu-ICEResin-collage-1Other materials and tools:
Burgandy Suede
Paint Brushes
Tooth Picks
Scissors
Flat Stick-on Pearls
5×7 inch Hard Canvas
Vintage-looking Photo (I found her on Graphics Fairy!) Tip: I printed a couple of duplicates just in case. (She might have become a card, but I did not have any red paper the right shade!)
Non-stick Craft Mat
Gloves: I did not use gloves, but if you have manicured nails you might want to as my gelicos are now truly due for a manicure. My thumb and forefinger are now leafed! I’m proudly telling anyone who asks I am crafty and artistic.

Instructions, commentary, tips, and a song for “Helen Louise’s Happy Christmas”:

Art Mechanique Paper Sealer1.  Use a flat bush to paint Vodka Martini on canvas in a slightly swishing motion. Let dry.

2.  Seal front and back of Collage Pack paper with Art Mechanique Sealer. Let dry completely.

Tip: You can seal one side and flip it immediately and brush sealer on other side.

3.  Use fine tip brush or a toothpick to paint Flitter Glue on the parts you want to highlight in photo. In this case, I chose to do the pine boughs the model was holding.

IndigoBlu-ICEResin-collage-4

Tip: The photo to the left is an example what happened when I used a fine tip brush and the Flitter Scrubby on the photo. What I learned: When you stamp with flitter, you “kiss” the paper with the stamp. Brushing the flitter on added a bit more glue than I might have liked, but I couldn’t bear to throw it out.

4.  Add Flitter Flakes. Shake off excess. IndogoBlu-ICEResin-collage-3

5.  Gently use Flitter Scrubby to “polish” the flake.

Tip: Gently. Scrub outward to inward. I tell you this because I didn’t and so I transferred a bit of flake where I didn’t originally plan. Ha! An excuse to fussy cut!

Alternative: The photo below is an example of using a toothpick to “paint” the Flitter Glue on the boughs. The trick to having the glue “kiss” the paper is taking a piece of non-stick craft mat, placing it on top and then pulling it off straight and quickly. You can use a baby wipe to clean the glue of f of the mat.

 

toothpick-ICE-Resin-Indigo-BLu I also found that if I used my fingernail rather than the scrubby to take off the excess flake, the result gave me pine boughs with a little bit of dimension. Woo hoo!

dimension-with-Flitter-and-ICE-Resin

6.  Fussy cut image while singing, “Oh Christmas tree, oh Christmas tree, how lovely are your branches.” This is sure to:

A)  Make you feel good about your project.

B)  Make anyone who hears you ask why you are singing Christmas songs before Halloween.

IndigoBlu-ICEResing-collage-5

7.  Paint pinecones with Goldfigner and Miss Moneypenny. Let dry.

Tip: I went ahead and sealed the edge of my photo because I cut it.indigoblu-iceresing-colllage-6

8.  Add pearls to pine boughs.

9.  Mix ICE Resin per manufacturer instructions. (One-to-one ratio of resin and hardener, stir gently and thoroughly stir for 2 minutes.)

10.  Paint a thin layer of ICE Resin on the canvas with a disposable paint brush.

11.  Place the paper in the center of the canvas. ICE Resin is your glue at this point. Paint a thin layer of ICE Resin on the paper.

12.  Place the girl on the paper.

indigoblu-iceresin-collage-713.  Paint a final layer of ICE Resin on the project and let dry 8 to 10 hours.

14.  I decided to embellish the edges of my piece with burgandy suede lace as I was still yearning for that pop of red.

15.  If you wish to hang your piece, you can affix a hanger to the back or you could take the glass out of a 5×7″ frame and place your collage in the frame.

 

                                                                           Christmas is just four months away (at the time of this hop).                                                                          When will you begin decorating and hang up your project?

I am lucky to hop with these exceptionally talented creatives. I know you will adore their projects:

 

Day Two Links:

Nikki K – http://fairyelephantdesign.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/ice-resin-blog-hop.html

Linda Walmsley – http://lindylou-lifeinthecraftlane.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/ice-resin-blog-hop.html

John Creighton Petersen – http://artnewwave.com/?p=982

Carol La Valley YOU ARE HERE ALREADY :)

Day One  Links just in case you missed ‘em:

Jenny Marples – http://pushingtherightbuttons.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/ice-resin-blog-hop.html

Lisa Baker – http://lisabdesignsinspiration.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/ice-resin-blog-hop.html

Kathy Cano Murillo –  http://www.craftychica.com/2014/08/quintessentially-christmas-gilded-butterfly-ornaments/

Jennifer Cabic –  http://jennifercabic.blogspot.com/2014/08/christmas-in-july-gilded-christmas.html

 

Indigo Blue ICE Resin ChristmasWant the chance to win an early Christmas gift?

Here are the rules:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Quintessentially Christmas Blog Hop with ICE Resin and Indigo Blu Kick-Off

ICE Resin Indigo Blu Christmas projects

Are you stoked? Ready for brilliant art, fabulous jewelry, Christmas decor, and gifts made with love?

You have landed on the right page! We are thrilled you are here.

Day One:

Kathy Cano Murillo http://www.craftychica.com/2014/08/quintessentially-christmas-gilded-butterfly-ornaments/

Jennifer Cabic http://jennifercabic.blogspot.com/2014/08/christmas-in-july-gilded-christmas.html

Jenny Marples – http://pushingtherightbuttons.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/ice-resin-blog-hop.html

Lisa Baker – http://lisabdesignsinspiration.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/ice-resin-blog-hop.html

 

IndigoBlu-ICEResing-teaseAh the anticipation of opening presents… Hear is a sneak peek at Day 2.

JCP_IndigoBlueHop_sneak

 

 

 

 

 

Want the chance to win an early Christmas gift aka prize?

 

Indigo Blue ICE Resin Christmas

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Won’t you come on back tomorrow?

How to Make Beads with Paper, ICE Resin, and Wire by John Creighton Petersen

make ICE Resin beads

It seems that no matter how precise I try to measure, I always end up with a little extra resin when I’m working on a project. And one of my favorite ways to use that resin is to create paper beads! The possibilities are endless, from simple embellishments to including them inside of a bezel or even making a bracelet!
My favorite papers to use are printed tissue papers (or make your own!) and old books because these types of paper absorb the resin so well, hold their shape, and have a beautiful antiqued finish when dry.
Patterns for paper beads can be found on the internet, but for most of my work I like to either free hand tear the paper or just free form cut a long triangle. One helpful hint is to have a good length, at least 7 or 8 inches long. This will give you enough paper to make the bead strong enough for using in your work.

ICE Resin paperSupplies:
ICE Resin®
Paper to create beads (old books, tissue paper, printed scrapbook paper, etc.)
Non- stick craft sheet or plastic bags (thin, from the grocery store)
Scissors
Wire and tools
Embellishments, beads, etc.
Skewer or awl (to wrap paper around)
Instructions:
1. Cut/tear paper to desired width and length, approximately 7 inches long.
2. Mix ICE Resin® following manufacturer’s instructions.
3. Lay paper down onto non-stick work surface and coat with resin. For thinner weight papers, the resin will naturally soak into the paper. If using a thicker weight paper it may be necessary to coat both sides of the paper.
4. Use a skewer or tip of an awl to wrap the end of the bead around. NOTE: if cut in a triangular shape, start with the widest end.
5. Begin to roll the paper onto the skewer, trying to keep a tight tension while rolling. Once the bead has started taking shape, the skewer can be removed.
6. Continue rolling the bead until the end has been reached; add additional resin if needed to hold the end down.
7. Allow paper bead to cure completely.
8. Embellish paper beads with wire, beads, etc.
Helpful hints:
• Using a small skewer will create a smaller hole in the bead which is more helpful for stringing when complete.
• Small clamps can be used if needed to hold the ends down while drying.
• Unfold a paper clip to create a stand for curing the paper beads.
• Do not leave the bead on the skewer – it will be very difficult to remove when dry.

 

I hope you had fun!

John Creighton-Petersen, Art New Wave

keep looking »
  • CREATIVE TEAM

    Ice Resin Creative Team
  • ICE RESIN® EBOOKS

    Imagine Create Explore
  • SHARE THE INSPIRATION


    Copy& Paste a badge
    into your blog!
  • Ice Resin Newsletter

    newsletter